Introduction

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Academic Search Premier: An Introduction

Academic Search Premier covers almost every subject area imaginable and has a good selection of magazines and journals. This database is a good starting place for a research project.

 

How to use this tutorial:

Use the arrows on the progress bar below to move forward and backwards.

Introduction

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Let's open Academic Search Premier to begin.

Here's how...

On the ASU Libraries' Home Page  find the box "Frequently Used Resources".

Click on Academic Search Premier to open it!

You may be prompted to enter your ASURITE ID and password.

You are now in Academic Search Premier.  

NOTE: If you enter via MyASU select the Library icon on the left > All Research Databases > Frequently Used Resources in the right column > click on Academic Search Premier.

Identifying Keywords

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Let's say your assignment is to write a research paper and your topic is:

 

Can social networking sites  such as Facebook affect your ability to get a job?

 

Your first step is to identify the keywords to use in your search. 

Keywords are important because library research databases do not operate like Google.

Keywords should describe the key concepts in your topic.  Keep in mind your keywords may change as you proceed and discover new terms.

 

Identifying Keywords

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Your topic again is: 

Can social networking sites  such as Facebook affect your ability to get a job?

 

Which keyword combination below is best for an effective search for your topic?

Identifying Keywords

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Now let's try a basic keyword search.

1. Type facebook job into the top search box on the page.

2. Click the Search button.

 

How many items were retrieved in this search?

 

That number seems a little small,  So how can we make our search better?

Remember: library research databases do not work like Google!

Unlike Google, databases use "connector" terms. Let's see what that means!

Using the Connector AND

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To effectively search Academic Search Premier or any other library database, you must link your keywords with search connectors.

AND is the most useful of search connectors. 

1. Clear your search using the 'clear' button.

2. Type Facebook in the box on first row and job in the box on second row. 

3. Click the Search button. 

NOTE: the AND on the left that links the boxes.

 

 

You should retrieve over 700 article records.  If not, check your spelling and make sure you have entered each word in a separate box.

Using the Connector AND

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What do you think happens when the AND connector is used between keywords?

Using the Connector OR

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We used Facebook AND job as our search. But are those actually the only relevant keywords? Think back to your keywords. What about using the synonym social networks with Facebook?

By using the connector OR, the search is expanded because it  retrieves articles that include either Facebook OR social networks.

 

1. Type Facebook OR social networks in the search box on first row.

2. Type job in the search box second or middle row.

3. Click Search

 

Using the Connector OR

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How many results did your search return?

 

REMEMBER: 

  • AND retrieves both (or all if using more than two) keywords in each article record;
  • OR retrieves either keyword in each article record.

Limiting Your Results

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With a topic like this, you would certainly want only the best and most recent information.

Looking at the left-hand column under Refine Results, you can see the date range of the articles you found.

        

Under "Limit to" move the date range tabs so that you are only receiving the articles from 2008 through now to update & limit the results.

Limiting Your Results

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How many results do you have now?

 

Limiting Your Results

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Again, looking at the left column of the search page, notice there are other ways to limit your searches under "Source Types".

Select Academic Journals to review your results.

 source types

 These are important source types for university research. Learn more about them in the Scholarly Journals Module of the Scholar Learning Badge.

Reading an Article Record

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Paying attention to the details of the article record is important because they help you:

  • determine the relevance of the article to your topic,
  • give you the information for citing the article, and
  • lead you to other ways to limit and focus your search.

 

Let's look at this article record on the first page of results:

The Writing on the (Facebook) Wall by Victoria Brown and Daly Vaughn

 

Reading an Article Record

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What is the title of the journal the article is published in?

 

What is the volume and issue number of the journal?

Reading an Article Record

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What is the purpose of the abstract?

Subject Terms in the Article Record

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Let's continue looking at the article record for

The Writing on the (Facebook) Wall by Victoria Brown and Daly Vaughn.

When you find an article that is relevant, like this one, look at the "Subjects" (at the bottom of the record).  These "Subjects" are assigned to describe the content of the article & may give you ideas for other terms to search.

For example, this article uses these subjects:

  • Online Social Networks and
  • Employee Selection.

These terms are more specific to the topic!

Subject Terms in the Article Record

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Let's see what happens when you do this search:

 

  • Online Social Networks AND Employee Selection

 

1. Clear your search using the 'clear' button.

2. Type Online Social Networks in the box on first row and Employee Selection in the box on second row.

3. Click the Search button.

 

Using these subjects should retrieve article records that are very relevant to your topic!

 

How many article records were retrieved

 

 

Getting the Complete Article (Full Text)

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Once you identify sources that might be useful for your paper, you need to locate the full text of those articles.  

In some cases, this will be easy, as you might see one of three types of full text links in the article record:

  • PDF full text: a scanned version of the paper journal, and always the best option you can choose.
  • HTML full text: a simple text version of the original article that has been re-typed into a webpage for you to read.
  • Linked full text: link to a PDF version of the article that exists somewhere outside of Academic Search Premier.

Getting the Complete Article (Full Text)

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If you don't see any of those options, you will see the GetIt!@ASU button.

GetIt!@ASU appears when the full text of the article is not in Academic Search Premier. It searches other ASU Libraries' databases and journal subscriptions to see if the article is available somewhere else.

For information about using this service go to GetIt!@ASU module of the Locator Badge.

 

Conclusion

 

 

 

Click to begin the Academic Search Premier Quiz